Student Comments at Mass

At a recent daily Mass I attended, the celebrating priest asked those attending the Mass, a few adults and a few students, for comments on the readings for the day. This was done presently after the priest’s homily, during the Mass. As my friends from BC and those who have taken a peek at this blog’s older posts may know, I tend to be traditional and by-the-book when it comes to the liturgy – the basic principle here being, why should the priest have the authority to change the rites that have been handed down to him. (This is presuming the option for congregational comment is not located in the Missal, which I believe is correct). I do realize that it is important to more fully engage the laity, especially students growing in the appropriation of their faith, in the liturgy, but I don’t think this is the way to do it. Anyways, enough – we can bicker about the execution of the liturgy in other posts.

What is remarkable here was that, though not entirely surprising, the comments each of the three students made in response to both the readings and the theme of the priest’s homily were remarkably spiritually mature and insightful. I can’t recall exactly what each of them said, outside of one of them mentioning “discerning the will of God,” but simply the graceful manner in which each young man spoke wowed me. How I wish I had the opportunity, or more accurately the desire, to be in such a healthy spiritual situation these young men are in – daily Mass, appropriation of Scripture, habitual self-reflection. Makes me smile thinking the good work St. Ignatius continues to do, not only in the intellectual, athletic, and service arenas, but also in the sacramental and spiritual arena of the human heart. Glad I can be here to help them grow in this area as well as others.

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About Michael Williams

Ardent greater Clevelander. Brewing industry laborer. Future Theology teacher. Truth seeker. Beloved adopted son of the Father thru JC in the Spirit.
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